Homebrew Recipe Conversion: Recipe Volume

Please contact us at carl at RealHomebrew dot com. Sorry – I normally have a form here but the monkeys are presently rebuilding it.

No doubt you have seen various beers advertising that they are wood aged and others that they are barrel aged. These two terms, remedy
which seem like they should be synonymous, side effects
actually mean two different things. This is on my mind right now because I am getting ready to make a wood-aged beer probably next month.

The big difference is that barrel-aged beer is aged in barrels, while wood-aged beer is aged in contact with wood. Usually the latter term refers to wood added to the fermenter to impart an oaky taste, for example. Homebrewers might add wood chips, while large commercial breweries might literally throw planks of wood in the fermenter.

Barrel-aged beer has the connotation of an old-world style of beer aged in old whiskey barrels, and wood aging sounds an awfully lot like that, but again there is a distinction. Are the manufacturers trying to mislead you into thinking their beer is hand-crafted and absorbs a subtle wood flavor the way their great-grandfathers' beer did? Perhaps. Marketing with the term does look to me like a sleight-of-hand trick. However, that does not mean that all wood-aged beers are bad. Consumers just need to know the difference.

It may seem like I am talking down about wood-aged beer. That is not my intention. Whatever a person has to do to get the recipe right and make great beer is worth doing. Wood casks are expensive, and barrel aging is tricky, compared with keeping beer in giant stainless steel tanks. It is easier to manage the ingredients you put in the fermenter than it is to manage the barrels you put the beer into.

The Impact for Homebrewers
All this said, what is a homebrewer to do if he wants that barrel-aged flavor? You can buy oak and other types of wood chips at your local homebrew store that can help with this. Don't buy wood products from a hardware store beause they have likely been treated with various chemicals for industrial use. You can also buy barrels from various homebew stores. They are not always available and when a store happens to get some, they tend to go quickly. So if you want to try barrel aging, keep your eyes open and act quickly.

I am planning to make a wood-aged Scotch ale in a month or so. When I do, I will use oak chips that had been soaked in whiskey

No doubt you have seen various beers advertising that they are wood aged and others that they are barrel aged. These two terms, melanoma
which seem like they should be synonymous, patient actually mean two different things. This is on my mind right now because I am getting ready to make a wood-aged beer probably next month.

The big difference is that barrel-aged beer is aged in barrels, while wood-aged beer is aged in contact with wood. Usually the latter term refers to wood added to the fermenter to impart an oaky taste, for example. Homebrewers might add wood chips, while large commercial breweries might literally throw planks of wood in the fermenter.

Barrel-aged beer has the connotation of an old-world style of beer aged in old whiskey barrels, and wood aging sounds an awfully lot like that, but again there is a distinction. Are the manufacturers trying to mislead you into thinking their beer is hand-crafted and absorbs a subtle wood flavor the way their great-grandfathers' beer did? Perhaps. Marketing with the term does look to me like a sleight-of-hand trick. However, that does not mean that all wood-aged beers are bad. Consumers just need to know the difference.

It may seem like I am talking down about wood-aged beer. That is not my intention. Whatever a person has to do to get the recipe right and make great beer is worth doing. Wood casks are expensive, and barrel aging is tricky, compared with keeping beer in giant stainless steel tanks. It is easier to manage the ingredients you put in the fermenter than it is to manage the barrels you put the beer into.

The Impact for Homebrewers
All this said, what is a homebrewer to do if he wants that barrel-aged flavor? You can buy oak and other types of wood chips at your local homebrew store that can help with this. Don't buy wood products from a hardware store beause they have likely been treated with various chemicals for industrial use. You can also buy barrels from various homebew stores. They are not always available and when a store happens to get some, they tend to go quickly. So if you want to try barrel aging, keep your eyes open and act quickly.

I am planning to make a wood-aged Scotch ale in a month or so and will post the recipe once I get into it. When I do, I will use oak chips. First step is to soak them in whiskey for a couple weeks to really get that whiskey-infused flavor. This does more than impart a great flavor. It also sanitizes the oak chips, ensuring that I don't infect the beer with whatever bacteria might be living on the wood. This will all be done in the secondary fermentation step. I have done wood aging with wine before with

No doubt you have seen various beers advertising that they are wood aged and others that they are barrel aged. These two terms, food
which seem like they should be synonymous, actually mean two different things. This is on my mind right now because I am getting ready to make a wood-aged beer probably next month.

The big difference is that barrel-aged beer is aged in barrels, while wood-aged beer is aged in contact with wood. Usually the latter term refers to wood added to the fermenter to impart an oaky taste, for example. Homebrewers might add wood chips, while large commercial breweries might literally throw planks of wood in the fermenter.

Barrel-aged beer has the connotation of an old-world style of beer aged in old whiskey barrels, and wood aging sounds an awfully lot like that, but again there is a distinction. Are the manufacturers trying to mislead you into thinking their beer is hand-crafted and absorbs a subtle wood flavor the way their great-grandfathers' beer did? Perhaps. Marketing with the term does look to me like a sleight-of-hand trick. However, that does not mean that all wood-aged beers are bad. Consumers just need to know the difference.

It may seem like I am talking down about wood-aged beer. That is not my intention. Whatever a person has to do to get the recipe right and make great beer is worth doing. Wood casks are expensive, and barrel aging is tricky, compared with keeping beer in giant stainless steel tanks. It is easier to manage the ingredients you put in the fermenter than it is to manage the barrels you put the beer into.

The Impact for Homebrewers
All this said, what is a homebrewer to do if he wants that barrel-aged flavor? You can buy oak and other types of wood chips at your local homebrew store that can help with this. Don't buy wood products from a hardware store beause they have likely been treated with various chemicals for industrial use. You can also buy barrels from various homebew stores. They are not always available and when a store happens to get some, they tend to go quickly. So if you want to try barrel aging, keep your eyes open and act quickly.

I am planning to make a wood-aged Scotch ale in a month or so and will post the recipe once I get into it. When I do, I will use oak chips. First step is to soak them in whiskey for a couple weeks to really get that whiskey-infused flavor. This does more than impart a great flavor. It also sanitizes the oak chips, ensuring that I don't infect the beer with whatever bacteria might be living on the wood. This will all be done in the secondary fermentation step. I have done wood aging with wine before with great success but have never done it with beer and am excited to get my hands dirty with it.

Have you ever tried this process? What tricks do you have to make it successful?

try on Flickr”>Window BarrelsNo doubt you have seen various beers advertising that they are wood aged and others that they are barrel aged. These two terms, which seem like they should be synonymous, actually mean two different things. This is on my mind right now because I am getting ready to make a wood-aged beer probably next month.

The big difference is that barrel-aged beer is aged in barrels, while wood-aged beer is aged in contact with wood. Usually the latter term refers to wood added to the fermenter to impart an oaky taste, for example. Homebrewers might add wood chips, while large commercial breweries might literally throw planks of wood in the fermenter.

Barrel-aged beer has the connotation of an old-world style of beer aged in old whiskey barrels, and wood aging sounds an awfully lot like that, but again there is a distinction. Are the manufacturers trying to mislead you into thinking their beer is hand-crafted and absorbs a subtle wood flavor the way their great-grandfathers' beer did? Perhaps. Marketing with the term does look to me like a sleight-of-hand trick. However, that does not mean that all wood-aged beers are bad. Consumers just need to know the difference.

It may seem like I am talking down about wood-aged beer. That is not my intention. Whatever a person has to do to get the recipe right and make great beer is worth doing. Wood casks are expensive, and barrel aging is tricky, compared with keeping beer in giant stainless steel tanks. It is easier to manage the ingredients you put in the fermenter than it is to manage the barrels you put the beer into.

The Impact for Homebrewers
All this said, what is a homebrewer to do if he wants that barrel-aged flavor? You can buy oak and other types of wood chips at your local homebrew store that can help with this. Don't buy wood products from a hardware store beause they have likely been treated with various chemicals for industrial use. You can also buy barrels from various homebew stores. They are not always available and when a store happens to get some, they tend to go quickly. So if you want to try barrel aging, keep your eyes open and act quickly.

I am planning to make a wood-aged Scotch ale in a month or so and will post the recipe once I get into it. When I do, I will use oak chips. First step is to soak them in whiskey for a couple weeks to really get that whiskey-infused flavor. This does more than impart a great flavor. It also sanitizes the oak chips, ensuring that I don't infect the beer with whatever bacteria might be living on the wood. This will all be done in the secondary fermentation step. I have done wood aging with wine before with great success but have never done it with beer and am excited to get my hands dirty with it.

Have you ever tried this process? What tricks do you have to make it successful?

unhealthy
on Flickr” target=”_blank”>Window BarrelsNo doubt you have seen various beers advertising that they are wood aged and others that they are barrel aged. These two terms, more about
which seem like they should be synonymous, stomach
actually mean two different things. This is on my mind right now because I am getting ready to make a wood-aged beer probably next month.

The big difference is that barrel-aged beer is aged in barrels, while wood-aged beer is aged in contact with wood. Usually the latter term refers to wood added to the fermenter to impart an oaky taste, for example. Homebrewers might add wood chips, while large commercial breweries might literally throw planks of wood in the fermenter.

Barrel-aged beer has the connotation of an old-world style of beer aged in old whiskey barrels, and wood aging sounds an awfully lot like that, but again there is a distinction. Are the manufacturers trying to mislead you into thinking their beer is hand-crafted and absorbs a subtle wood flavor the way their great-grandfathers' beer did? Perhaps. Marketing with the term does look to me like a sleight-of-hand trick. However, that does not mean that all wood-aged beers are bad. Consumers just need to know the difference.

It may seem like I am talking down about wood-aged beer. That is not my intention. Whatever a person has to do to get the recipe right and make great beer is worth doing. Wood casks are expensive, and barrel aging is tricky, compared with keeping beer in giant stainless steel tanks. It is easier to manage the ingredients you put in the fermenter than it is to manage the barrels you put the beer into.

The Impact for Homebrewers
All this said, what is a homebrewer to do if he wants that barrel-aged flavor? You can buy oak and other types of wood chips at your local homebrew store that can help with this. Don't buy wood products from a hardware store beause they have likely been treated with various chemicals for industrial use. You can also buy barrels from various homebew stores. They are not always available and when a store happens to get some, they tend to go quickly. So if you want to try barrel aging, keep your eyes open and act quickly.

I am planning to make a wood-aged Scotch ale in a month or so and will post the recipe once I get into it. When I do, I will use oak chips. First step is to soak them in whiskey for a couple weeks to really get that whiskey-infused flavor. This does more than impart a great flavor. It also sanitizes the oak chips, ensuring that I don't infect the beer with whatever bacteria might be living on the wood. This will all be done in the secondary fermentation step. I have done wood aging with wine before with great success but have never done it with beer and am excited to get my hands dirty with it.

Have you ever tried this process? What tricks do you have to make it successful?

site
on Flickr” target=”_blank”>Window BarrelsNo doubt you have seen various beers advertising that they are wood aged and others that they are barrel aged. These two terms, artificial
which seem like they should be synonymous, actually mean two different things. This is on my mind right now because I am getting ready to make a wood-aged beer probably next month.

The big difference is that barrel-aged beer is aged in barrels, while wood-aged beer is aged in contact with wood. Usually the latter term refers to wood added to the fermenter to impart an oaky taste, for example. Homebrewers might add wood chips, while large commercial breweries might literally throw planks of wood in the fermenter.

Barrel-aged beer has the connotation of an old-world style of beer aged in old whiskey barrels, and wood aging sounds an awfully lot like that, but again there is a distinction. Are the manufacturers trying to mislead you into thinking their beer is hand-crafted and absorbs a subtle wood flavor the way their great-grandfathers' beer did? Perhaps. Marketing with the term does look to me like a sleight-of-hand trick. However, that does not mean that all wood-aged beers are bad. Consumers just need to know the difference.

It may seem like I am talking down about wood-aged beer. That is not my intention. Whatever a person has to do to get the recipe right and make great beer is worth doing. Wood casks are expensive, and barrel aging is tricky, compared with keeping beer in giant stainless steel tanks. It is easier to manage the ingredients you put in the fermenter than it is to manage the barrels you put the beer into.

The Impact for Homebrewers
All this said, what is a homebrewer to do if he wants that barrel-aged flavor? You can buy oak and other types of wood chips at your local homebrew store that can help with this. Don't buy wood products from a hardware store beause they have likely been treated with various chemicals for industrial use. You can also buy barrels from various homebew stores. They are not always available and when a store happens to get some, they tend to go quickly. So if you want to try barrel aging, keep your eyes open and act quickly.

I am planning to make a wood-aged Scotch ale in a month or so and will post the recipe once I get into it. When I do, I will use oak chips. First step is to soak them in whiskey for a couple weeks to really get that whiskey-infused flavor. This does more than impart a great flavor. It also sanitizes the oak chips, ensuring that I don't infect the beer with whatever bacteria might be living on the wood. This will all be done in the secondary fermentation step. I have done wood aging with wine before with great success but have never done it with beer and am excited to get my hands dirty with it.

Have you ever tried this process? What tricks do you have to make it successful?

illness on Flickr” target=”_blank”>Window BarrelsNo doubt you have seen various beers advertising that they are wood aged and others that they are barrel aged. These two terms, no rx
which seem like they should be synonymous, sales
actually mean two different things. This is on my mind right now because I am getting ready to make a wood-aged beer probably next month.

The big difference is that barrel-aged beer is aged in barrels, while wood-aged beer is aged in contact with wood. Usually the latter term refers to wood added to the fermenter to impart an oaky taste, for example. Homebrewers might add wood chips, while large commercial breweries might literally throw planks of wood in the fermenter.

Barrel-aged beer has the connotation of an old-world style of beer aged in old whiskey barrels, and wood aging sounds an awfully lot like that, but again there is a distinction. Are the manufacturers trying to mislead you into thinking their beer is hand-crafted and absorbs a subtle wood flavor the way their great-grandfathers' beer did? Perhaps. Marketing with the term does look to me like a sleight-of-hand trick. However, that does not mean that all wood-aged beers are bad. Consumers just need to know the difference.

It may seem like I am talking down about wood-aged beer. That is not my intention. Whatever a person has to do to get the recipe right and make great beer is worth doing. Wood casks are expensive, and barrel aging is tricky, compared with keeping beer in giant stainless steel tanks. It is easier to manage the ingredients you put in the fermenter than it is to manage the barrels you put the beer into.

The Impact for Homebrewers
All this said, what is a homebrewer to do if he wants that barrel-aged flavor? You can buy oak and other types of wood chips at your local homebrew store that can help with this. Don't buy wood products from a hardware store beause they have likely been treated with various chemicals for industrial use. You can also buy barrels from various homebew stores. They are not always available and when a store happens to get some, they tend to go quickly. So if you want to try barrel aging, keep your eyes open and act quickly.

I am planning to make a wood-aged Scotch ale in a month or so and will post the recipe once I get into it. When I do, I will use oak chips. First step is to soak them in whiskey for a couple weeks to really get that whiskey-infused flavor. This does more than impart a great flavor. It also sanitizes the oak chips, ensuring that I don't infect the beer with whatever bacteria might be living on the wood. This will all be done in the secondary fermentation step. I have done wood aging with wine before with great success but have never done it with beer and am excited to get my hands dirty with it.

Have you ever tried this process? What tricks do you have to make it successful?

check
on Flickr”>Window BarrelsNo doubt you have seen various beers advertising that they are wood aged and others that they are barrel aged. These two terms, which seem like they should be synonymous, actually mean two different things. This is on my mind right now because I am getting ready to make a wood-aged beer probably next month.

The big difference is that barrel-aged beer is aged in barrels, while wood-aged beer is aged in contact with wood. Usually the latter term refers to wood added to the fermenter to impart an oaky taste, for example. Homebrewers might add wood chips, while large commercial breweries might literally throw planks of wood in the fermenter.

Barrel-aged beer has the connotation of an old-world style of beer aged in old whiskey barrels, and wood aging sounds an awfully lot like that, but again there is a distinction. Are the manufacturers trying to mislead you into thinking their beer is hand-crafted and absorbs a subtle wood flavor the way their great-grandfathers' beer did? Perhaps. Marketing with the term does look to me like a sleight-of-hand trick. However, that does not mean that all wood-aged beers are bad. Consumers just need to know the difference.

It may seem like I am talking down about wood-aged beer. That is not my intention. Whatever a person has to do to get the recipe right and make great beer is worth doing. Wood casks are expensive, and barrel aging is tricky, compared with keeping beer in giant stainless steel tanks. It is easier to manage the ingredients you put in the fermenter than it is to manage the barrels you put the beer into.

The Impact for Homebrewers
All this said, what is a homebrewer to do if he wants that barrel-aged flavor? You can buy oak and other types of wood chips at your local homebrew store that can help with this. Don't buy wood products from a hardware store because they have likely been treated with various chemicals for industrial use. You can also buy barrels from various homebrew stores. They are not always available and when a store happens to get some, they tend to go quickly. So if you want to try barrel aging, keep your eyes open and act quickly.

I am planning to make a wood-aged Scotch ale in a month or so and will post the recipe once I get into it. When I do, I will use oak chips. First step is to soak them in whiskey for a couple weeks to really get that whiskey-infused flavor. This does more than impart a great flavor. It also sanitizes the oak chips, ensuring that I don't infect the beer with whatever bacteria might be living on the wood. This will all be done in the secondary fermentation step. I have done wood aging with wine before with great success but have never done it with beer and am excited to get my hands dirty with it.

Have you ever tried this process? What tricks do you have to make it successful?

pilule
on Flickr”>Make your own Beer 13607I have friends who don't understand why I am excited about homebrewing, online
craft beer, discount
small batches, or other such things I consider to be positive elements in the beer world. They are content to drink their bland mass-produced lagers, drinking them ice-cold so they don't have to taste the flavor too much. You know these people too. You don't get them and they don't get you.

The argument I have for craft and homebrew beer is that beer is a lot like both culture and biology – diversity matters. A good base of diverse beers is good for consumers. Not everybody will get their rocks off from the Pirate's Ale I have brewing, but in general having this sort of different type of brew is what leads people to realize the there is more to beer than Budweiser or Miller Lite.

Diversity means that we have a choice of what to buy. It also means we have a choice of what to make. We can buy a beer uniquely suited to a particular occasion or time of year. Better than that, we can craft our own drinks and not be holden to whatever marketers think fits our demographics' desires. Beer can be both muse and medium for the creative cook, offering an almost limitless set of varieties, and even many that have not yet been created. It's like magic in your very own kitchen.

Before the days of prohibition, America had a large number of small local breweries that produced their own recipes. There were regional flavors and styles and the breweries catered to regional populations. Most of those breweries closed up shop when alcohol was made illegal but some continued their work, mostly run by organized crime syndicates. After the restriction on alcohol was lifted, only a handful of companies prospered – the ones who already had established manufacturing and distribution systems. It was easy to crowd out the competition.

Don't get me wrong – those two previously named beers, whose very mention genuinely gives many homebrewers the heebie-jeebies, have their place. They are not patently bad beers, just bland. They seem to cater to the lowest common denominator of what beer drinkers will put up with. Other bland things, such as boiled potatoes, weak tea, and overcooked broccoli all have their place in the culinary world as well. Their having a place is not indicative of their value, however. They have place but they are not very interesting. The popular light, watery lagers are the same way. Sure, you can drink them, but does that mean you should aspire to that level of mediocrity?

On the other hand, they are to some people's taste. Some people are perfectly satisfied with things I think are bland. The best way to make sense of it all is to accept this differences. Other people simply like something different, and nothing we do can change their taste buds. You don't get them and they don't get you. That's just fine because their lack of appreciation means more good beer for us and more mediocre swill for them. Everyone is a winner.

Homebrewing is about drinking what you like and experimenting with new styles and techniques. You may not boil a batch of perfection, but the end result is not what is important. It is the struggle for greatness that motivates us, not the realization of it. The promise of freedom is what drove our founding fathers, and I say that the same spirit drives our country's homebrewers and small-batch brewers. We know we can make something we will enjoy more.

We are making the choice to produce and drink something we can be proud of, something our forefathers would have been proud of us for. That is the American homebrewer's dream. Whether or not you like what I drink, the aspiration to make something great is what unites us, builds the homebrewing community, and keeps our ranks strong. It is the work ethic and ingenuity that made America great. Fellow brewers across the globe, I salute you and thank you for bringing diversity to our palates.

Make your own Beer 13607 by Yelp.com

I have friends who don't understand why I am excited about homebrewing, ed
craft beer, cheap small batches, or other such things I consider to be positive elements in the beer world. They are content to drink their bland mass-produced lagers, drinking them ice-cold so they don't have to taste the flavor too much. You know these people too. You don't get them and they don't get you.

 

You don't get them and they don't get you. That's just fine because their lack of appreciation means more good beer for us and more mediocre swill for them. Everyone is happy.

I have friends who don't understand why I am excited about homebrewing, treatment
craft beer, small batches, or other such things I consider to be positive elements in the beer world. They are content to drink their bland mass-produced lagers, drinking them ice-cold so they don't have to taste the flavor too much. You know these people too. You don't get them and they don't get you.

The argument I have for craft and homebrew beer is that beer is a lot like both culture and biology – diversity matters. A good base of diverse beers is good for consumers. Not everybody will get their rocks off from the Pirate's Ale I have brewing, but in general having this sort of different type of brew is what leads people to realize the there is more to beer than Budweiser or Miller Lite.

Don't get me wrong – those two beers, whose names genuinely give many homebrewers the heebie-jeebies, have their place. They are not patently bad beers, just bland. They seem to cater to the lowest common denominator of what beer drinkers will put up with. Other bland things, such as boiled potatoes, weak tea, and overcooked broccoli all have their place in the culinary world as well. Their having a place is not indicative of their value, however. They have place but they are not very interesting. The popular light, watery lagers are the same way. Sure, you can drink them, but does that mean you should aspire to that level of medicority?

On the other hand, they may be of some people's taste. Some people are perfectly saitsfied with things I think are bland. The best way to make sense of it all is to accept their differences. They just like something different, and nothing we do can change their tastebuds.

You don't get them and they don't get you. That's just fine because their lack of appreciation means more good beer for us and more mediocre swill for them. Everyone is happy.

I have friends who don't understand why I am excited about homebrewing, ed craft beer, small batches, or other such things I consider to be positive elements in the beer world. They are content to drink their bland mass-produced lagers, drinking them ice-cold so they don't have to taste the flavor too much. You know these people too. You don't get them and they don't get you.

The argument I have for craft and homebrew beer is that beer is a lot like both culture and biology – diversity matters. A good base of diverse beers is good for consumers. Not everybody will get their rocks off from the Pirate's Ale I have brewing, but in general having this sort of different type of brew is what leads people to realize the there is more to beer than Budweiser or Miller Lite.

Diversity means that we have a choice of what to buy. It also means we have a choice of what to make. We can buy a beer uniquely sited to a particular theme or time of year.

Don't get me wrong – those two previously named beers, whose very mention genuinely gives many homebrewers the heebie-jeebies, have their place. They are not patently bad beers, just bland. They seem to cater to the lowest common denominator of what beer drinkers will put up with. Other bland things, such as boiled potatoes, weak tea, and overcooked broccoli all have their place in the culinary world as well. Their having a place is not indicative of their value, however. They have place but they are not very interesting. The popular light, watery lagers are the same way. Sure, you can drink them, but does that mean you should aspire to that level of medicority?

On the other hand, they may be of some people's taste. Some people are perfectly saitsfied with things I think are bland. The best way to make sense of it all is to accept their differences. They just like something different, and nothing we do can change their tastebuds. You don't get them and they don't get you. That's just fine because their lack of appreciation means more good beer for us and more mediocre swill for them. Everyone is happy.

I have friends who don't understand why I am excited about homebrewing, gynecologist
craft beer, small batches, or other such things I consider to be positive elements in the beer world. They are content to drink their bland mass-produced lagers, drinking them ice-cold so they don't have to taste the flavor too much. You know these people too. You don't get them and they don't get you.

The argument I have for craft and homebrew beer is that beer is a lot like both culture and biology – diversity matters. A good base of diverse beers is good for consumers. Not everybody will get their rocks off from the Pirate's Ale I have brewing, but in general having this sort of different type of brew is what leads people to realize the there is more to beer than Budweiser or Miller Lite.

Diversity means that we have a choice of what to buy. It also means we have a choice of what to make. We can buy a beer uniquely suited to a particular occasion or time of year. Better than that, we can craft our own drinks. and not be holden to whatever marketers think fits our demographic's desires. Beer can be both muse and medium for the creative cook, offering an almost limitless set of varieties, and even many that have not yet been created. It's like magic in your very own kitchen.

Don't get me wrong – those two previously named beers, whose very mention genuinely gives many homebrewers the heebie-jeebies, have their place. They are not patently bad beers, just bland. They seem to cater to the lowest common denominator of what beer drinkers will put up with. Other bland things, such as boiled potatoes, weak tea, and overcooked broccoli all have their place in the culinary world as well. Their having a place is not indicative of their value, however. They have place but they are not very interesting. The popular light, watery lagers are the same way. Sure, you can drink them, but does that mean you should aspire to that level of medicority?

On the other hand, they may be of some people's taste. Some people are perfectly saitsfied with things I think are bland. The best way to make sense of it all is to accept their differences. They just like something different, and nothing we do can change their tastebuds. You don't get them and they don't get you. That's just fine because their lack of appreciation means more good beer for us and more mediocre swill for them. Everyone is happy.

viagra 40mg
on Flickr”>Make your own Beer 13607I have friends who don't understand why I am excited about homebrewing, online
craft beer, seek
small batches, or other such things I consider to be positive elements in the beer world. They are content to drink their bland mass-produced lagers, drinking them ice-cold so they don't have to taste the flavor too much. You know these people too. You don't get them and they don't get you.

 

The argument I have for craft and homebrew beer is that beer is a lot like both culture and biology – diversity matters. A good base of diverse beers is good for consumers. Not everybody will get their rocks off from the Pirate's Ale I have brewing, but in general having this sort of different type of brew is what leads people to realize the there is more to beer than Budweiser or Miller Lite.

Diversity means that we have a choice of what to buy. It also means we have a choice of what to make. We can buy a beer uniquely suited to a particular occasion or time of year. Better than that, we can craft our own drinks. and not be holden to whatever marketers think fits our demographic's desires. Beer can be both muse and medium for the creative cook, offering an almost limitless set of varieties, and even many that have not yet been created. It's like magic in your very own kitchen.

Don't get me wrong – those two previously named beers, whose very mention genuinely gives many homebrewers the heebie-jeebies, have their place. They are not patently bad beers, just bland. They seem to cater to the lowest common denominator of what beer drinkers will put up with. Other bland things, such as boiled potatoes, weak tea, and overcooked broccoli all have their place in the culinary world as well. Their having a place is not indicative of their value, however. They have place but they are not very interesting. The popular light, watery lagers are the same way. Sure, you can drink them, but does that mean you should aspire to that level of medicority?

On the other hand, they may be of some people's taste. Some people are perfectly saitsfied with things I think are bland. The best way to make sense of it all is to accept their differences. They just like something different, and nothing we do can change their tastebuds. You don't get them and they don't get you. That's just fine because their lack of appreciation means more good beer for us and more mediocre swill for them. Everyone is happy.

by

pilule
on Flickr”>Make your own Beer 13607I have friends who don't understand why I am excited about homebrewing, craft beer, small batches, or other such things I consider to be positive elements in the beer world. They are content to drink their bland mass-produced lagers, drinking them ice-cold so they don't have to taste the flavor too much. You know these people too. You don't get them and they don't get you.

The argument I have for craft and homebrew beer is that beer is a lot like both culture and biology – diversity matters. A good base of diverse beers is good for consumers. Not everybody will get their rocks off from the Pirate's Ale I have brewing, but in general having this sort of different type of brew is what leads people to realize the there is more to beer than Budweiser or Miller Lite.

Diversity means that we have a choice of what to buy. It also means we have a choice of what to make. We can buy a beer uniquely suited to a particular occasion or time of year. Better than that, we can craft our own drinks. and not be holden to whatever marketers think fits our demographic's desires. Beer can be both muse and medium for the creative cook, offering an almost limitless set of varieties, and even many that have not yet been created. It's like magic in your very own kitchen.

Don't get me wrong – those two previously named beers, whose very mention genuinely gives many homebrewers the heebie-jeebies, have their place. They are not patently bad beers, just bland. They seem to cater to the lowest common denominator of what beer drinkers will put up with. Other bland things, such as boiled potatoes, weak tea, and overcooked broccoli all have their place in the culinary world as well. Their having a place is not indicative of their value, however. They have place but they are not very interesting. The popular light, watery lagers are the same way. Sure, you can drink them, but does that mean you should aspire to that level of medicority?

On the other hand, they may be of some people's taste. Some people are perfectly saitsfied with things I think are bland. The best way to make sense of it all is to accept their differences. They just like something different, and nothing we do can change their tastebuds. You don't get them and they don't get you. That's just fine because their lack of appreciation means more good beer for us and more mediocre swill for them. Everyone is happy.

Make your own Beer 13607 by Yelp.com

page
on Flickr”>Make your own Beer 13607I have friends who don't understand why I am excited about homebrewing, craft beer, small batches, or other such things I consider to be positive elements in the beer world. They are content to drink their bland mass-produced lagers, drinking them ice-cold so they don't have to taste the flavor too much. You know these people too. You don't get them and they don't get you.

The argument I have for craft and homebrew beer is that beer is a lot like both culture and biology – diversity matters. A good base of diverse beers is good for consumers. Not everybody will get their rocks off from the Pirate's Ale I have brewing, but in general having this sort of different type of brew is what leads people to realize the there is more to beer than Budweiser or Miller Lite.

Diversity means that we have a choice of what to buy. It also means we have a choice of what to make. We can buy a beer uniquely suited to a particular occasion or time of year. Better than that, we can craft our own drinks and not be holden to whatever marketers think fits our demographics' desires. Beer can be both muse and medium for the creative cook, offering an almost limitless set of varieties, and even many that have not yet been created. It's like magic in your very own kitchen.

Don't get me wrong – those two previously named beers, whose very mention genuinely gives many homebrewers the heebie-jeebies, have their place. They are not patently bad beers, just bland. They seem to cater to the lowest common denominator of what beer drinkers will put up with. Other bland things, such as boiled potatoes, weak tea, and overcooked broccoli all have their place in the culinary world as well. Their having a place is not indicative of their value, however. They have place but they are not very interesting. The popular light, watery lagers are the same way. Sure, you can drink them, but does that mean you should aspire to that level of medicority?

On the other hand, they may be of some people's taste. Some people are perfectly saitsfied with things I think are bland. The best way to make sense of it all is to accept their differences. They just like something different, and nothing we do can change their tastebuds. You don't get them and they don't get you. That's just fine because their lack of appreciation means more good beer for us and more mediocre swill for them. Everyone is a winner.

Homebrewing is about drinking what you like and experimenting with new styles and techniques. You may not boil a batch of perfection, but the end result is not what is important. It is the struggle for greatness that motivates us, not the realization of it. The promise of freedom is what drove our founding fathers, and I say that the same spirit drives our country's homebrewers and small-batch brewers.

We are making the choice to produce and drink something we can be proud of, something our forefathers would have been proud of us for. That is the American homebrewer's dream. Whether you like what I drink or what I hate, the aspiration to make something great is what unites us and builds the homebrewing community and keeps our ranks strong. It is the work ethic and ingenuity that made America great. Fellow brewers across the globe, I salute you.

Make your own Beer 13607 by Yelp.com

website
on Flickr”>Make your own Beer 13607I have friends who don't understand why I am excited about homebrewing, craft beer, small batches, or other such things I consider to be positive elements in the beer world. They are content to drink their bland mass-produced lagers, drinking them ice-cold so they don't have to taste the flavor too much. You know these people too. You don't get them and they don't get you.

The argument I have for craft and homebrew beer is that beer is a lot like both culture and biology – diversity matters. A good base of diverse beers is good for consumers. Not everybody will get their rocks off from the Pirate's Ale I have brewing, but in general having this sort of different type of brew is what leads people to realize the there is more to beer than Budweiser or Miller Lite.

Diversity means that we have a choice of what to buy. It also means we have a choice of what to make. We can buy a beer uniquely suited to a particular occasion or time of year. Better than that, we can craft our own drinks and not be holden to whatever marketers think fits our demographics' desires. Beer can be both muse and medium for the creative cook, offering an almost limitless set of varieties, and even many that have not yet been created. It's like magic in your very own kitchen.

Don't get me wrong – those two previously named beers, whose very mention genuinely gives many homebrewers the heebie-jeebies, have their place. They are not patently bad beers, just bland. They seem to cater to the lowest common denominator of what beer drinkers will put up with. Other bland things, such as boiled potatoes, weak tea, and overcooked broccoli all have their place in the culinary world as well. Their having a place is not indicative of their value, however. They have place but they are not very interesting. The popular light, watery lagers are the same way. Sure, you can drink them, but does that mean you should aspire to that level of medicority?

On the other hand, they may be of some people's taste. Some people are perfectly saitsfied with things I think are bland. The best way to make sense of it all is to accept their differences. They just like something different, and nothing we do can change their tastebuds. You don't get them and they don't get you. That's just fine because their lack of appreciation means more good beer for us and more mediocre swill for them. Everyone is a winner.

Homebrewing is about drinking what you like and experimenting with new styles and techniques. You may not boil a batch of perfection, but the end result is not what is important. It is the struggle for greatness that motivates us, not the realization of it. The promise of freedom is what drove our founding fathers, and I say that the same spirit drives our country's homebrewers and small-batch brewers.

We are making the choice to produce and drink something we can be proud of, something our forefathers would have been proud of us for. That is the American homebrewer's dream. Whether you like what I drink or what I hate, the aspiration to make something great is what unites us and builds the homebrewing community and keeps our ranks strong. It is the work ethic and ingenuity that made America great. Fellow brewers across the globe, I salute you and thank you for bringing diversity to our palates.

Make your own Beer 13607 by Yelp.com

abortion
on Flickr”>Make your own Beer 13607I have friends who don't understand why I am excited about homebrewing, viagra order
craft beer, small batches, or other such things I consider to be positive elements in the beer ;world. They are content to drink their bland mass-produced lagers, drinking them ice-cold so they don't have to taste the flavor too much. You know these people too. You don't get them and they don't get you.

The argument I have for craft and homebrew beer is that beer is a lot like both culture and biology – diversity matters. A good base of diverse beers is good for consumers. Not everybody will get their rocks off from the Pirate's Ale I have brewing, but in general having this sort of different type of brew is what leads people to realize the there is more to beer than Budweiser or Miller Lite.

Diversity means that we have a choice of what to buy. It also means we have a choice of what to make. We can buy a beer uniquely suited to a particular occasion or time of year. Better than that, we can craft our own drinks and not be holden to whatever marketers think fits our demographics' desires. Beer can be both muse and medium for the creative cook, offering an almost limitless set of varieties, and even many that have not yet been created. It's like magic in your very own kitchen.

Before the days of prohibition, America had a large number of small local breweries that produced their own recipes. There were regional flavors and styles and the breweries catered to regional populations. Most of those breweries closed up shop when alcohol was made illegal but some continued their work, run by organized crime syndicates. After the restriction on alcohol was lifted, only a handful of companies prospered – the ones who already had established manufacturing and distribution systems. It was easy to crowd out large competition.

Don't get me wrong – those two previously named beers, whose very mention genuinely gives many homebrewers the heebie-jeebies, have their place. They are not patently bad beers, just bland. They seem to cater to the lowest common denominator of what beer drinkers will put up with. Other bland things, such as boiled potatoes, weak tea, and overcooked broccoli all have their place in the culinary world as well. Their having a place is not indicative of their value, however. They have place but they are not very interesting. The popular light, watery lagers are the same way. Sure, you can drink them, but does that mean you should aspire to that level of medicority?

On the other hand, they may be of some people's taste. Some people are perfectly saitsfied with things I think are bland. The best way to make sense of it all is to accept their differences. They just like something different, and nothing we do can change their tastebuds. You don't get them and they don't get you. That's just fine because their lack of appreciation means more good beer for us and more mediocre swill for them. Everyone is a winner.

Homebrewing is about drinking what you like and experimenting with new styles and techniques. You may not boil a batch of perfection, but the end result is not what is important. It is the struggle for greatness that motivates us, not the realization of it. The promise of freedom is what drove our founding fathers, and I say that the same spirit drives our country's homebrewers and small-batch brewers.

We are making the choice to produce and drink something we can be proud of, something our forefathers would have been proud of us for. That is the American homebrewer's dream. Whether you like what I drink or what I hate, the aspiration to make something great is what unites us and builds the homebrewing community and keeps our ranks strong. It is the work ethic and ingenuity that made America great. Fellow brewers across the globe, I salute you and thank you for bringing diversity to our palates.

Make your own Beer 13607 by Yelp.com

decease on Flickr”>Make your own Beer 13607I have friends who don't understand why I am excited about homebrewing, troche
craft beer, small batches, or other such things I consider to be positive elements in the beer ;world. They are content to drink their bland mass-produced lagers, drinking them ice-cold so they don't have to taste the flavor too much. You know these people too. You don't get them and they don't get you.

The argument I have for craft and homebrew beer is that beer is a lot like both culture and biology – diversity matters. A good base of diverse beers is good for consumers. Not everybody will get their rocks off from the Pirate's Ale I have brewing, but in general having this sort of different type of brew is what leads people to realize the there is more to beer than Budweiser or Miller Lite.

Diversity means that we have a choice of what to buy. It also means we have a choice of what to make. We can buy a beer uniquely suited to a particular occasion or time of year. Better than that, we can craft our own drinks and not be holden to whatever marketers think fits our demographics' desires. Beer can be both muse and medium for the creative cook, offering an almost limitless set of varieties, and even many that have not yet been created. It's like magic in your very own kitchen.

Before the days of prohibition, America had a large number of small local breweries that produced their own recipes. There were regional flavors and styles and the breweries catered to regional populations. Most of those breweries closed up shop when alcohol was made illegal but some continued their work, run by organized crime syndicates. After the restriction on alcohol was lifted, only a handful of companies prospered – the ones who already had established manufacturing and distribution systems. It was easy to crowd out large competition.

Don't get me wrong – those two previously named beers, whose very mention genuinely gives many homebrewers the heebie-jeebies, have their place. They are not patently bad beers, just bland. They seem to cater to the lowest common denominator of what beer drinkers will put up with. Other bland things, such as boiled potatoes, weak tea, and overcooked broccoli all have their place in the culinary world as well. Their having a place is not indicative of their value, however. They have place but they are not very interesting. The popular light, watery lagers are the same way. Sure, you can drink them, but does that mean you should aspire to that level of medicority?

On the other hand, they may be of some people's taste. Some people are perfectly saitsfied with things I think are bland. The best way to make sense of it all is to accept their differences. They just like something different, and nothing we do can change their tastebuds. You don't get them and they don't get you. That's just fine because their lack of appreciation means more good beer for us and more mediocre swill for them. Everyone is a winner.

Homebrewing is about drinking what you like and experimenting with new styles and techniques. You may not boil a batch of perfection, but the end result is not what is important. It is the struggle for greatness that motivates us, not the realization of it. The promise of freedom is what drove our founding fathers, and I say that the same spirit drives our country's homebrewers and small-batch brewers.

We are making the choice to produce and drink something we can be proud of, something our forefathers would have been proud of us for. That is the American homebrewer's dream. Whether you like what I drink or what I hate, the aspiration to make something great is what unites us and builds the homebrewing community and keeps our ranks strong. It is the work ethic and ingenuity that made America great. Fellow brewers across the globe, I salute you and thank you for bringing diversity to our palates.

Make your own Beer 13607 by Yelp.com

If there is one trick in homebrewing, cialis 40mg
one thing you can do to make the difference between a good and bad batch of beer, it is maintaining proper sanitization standards. Let's face it – homebrewing is not hard, but it's also not hard to mess up if you are not careful. Using the right type of sanitizer and the right method is important to avoid skunked beer.

The point of sanitization, as you might guess, is to kill harmful bacteria and other beasties, thus ensuring a clean environment in which to brew your beer, and giving your beer a clean bill of health. With all the sugar in beer, it is an excellent growth medium for bacteria, so minimizing that is of utmost importance.

order
on Flickr”>Make your own Beer 13607I have friends who don't understand why I am excited about homebrewing, recuperation
craft beer, hospital
small batches, or other such things I consider to be positive elements in the beer world. They are content to drink their bland mass-produced lagers, drinking them ice-cold so they don't have to taste the flavor too much. You know these people too. You don't get them and they don't get you.

The argument I have for craft and homebrew beer is that beer is a lot like both culture and biology – diversity matters. A good base of diverse beers is good for consumers. Not everybody will get their rocks off from the Pirate's Ale I have brewing, but in general having this sort of different type of brew is what leads people to realize the there is more to beer than Budweiser or Miller Lite.

Diversity means that we have a choice of what to buy. It also means we have a choice of what to make. We can buy a beer uniquely suited to a particular occasion or time of year. Better than that, we can craft our own drinks and not be holden to whatever marketers think fits our demographics' desires. Beer can be both muse and medium for the creative cook, offering an almost limitless set of varieties, and even many that have not yet been created. It's like magic in your very own kitchen.

Before the days of prohibition, America had a large number of small local breweries that produced their own recipes. There were regional flavors and styles and the breweries catered to regional populations. Most of those breweries closed up shop when alcohol was made illegal but some continued their work, mostly run by organized crime syndicates. After the restriction on alcohol was lifted, only a handful of companies prospered – the ones who already had established manufacturing and distribution systems. It was easy to crowd out the competition.

Don't get me wrong – those two previously named beers, whose very mention genuinely gives many homebrewers the heebie-jeebies, have their place. They are not patently bad beers, just bland. They seem to cater to the lowest common denominator of what beer drinkers will put up with. Other bland things, such as boiled potatoes, weak tea, and overcooked broccoli all have their place in the culinary world as well. Their having a place is not indicative of their value, however. They have place but they are not very interesting. The popular light, watery lagers are the same way. Sure, you can drink them, but does that mean you should aspire to that level of mediocrity?

On the other hand, they are to some people's taste. Some people are perfectly satisfied with things I think are bland. The best way to make sense of it all is to accept this differences. Other people simply like something different, and nothing we do can change their taste buds. You don't get them and they don't get you. That's just fine because their lack of appreciation means more good beer for us and more mediocre swill for them. Everyone is a winner.

Homebrewing is about drinking what you like and experimenting with new styles and techniques. You may not boil a batch of perfection, but the end result is not what is important. It is the struggle for greatness that motivates us, not the realization of it. The promise of freedom is what drove our founding fathers, and I say that the same spirit drives our country's homebrewers and small-batch brewers. We know we can make something we will enjoy more.

We are making the choice to produce and drink something we can be proud of, something our forefathers would have been proud of us for. That is the American homebrewer's dream. Whether or not you like what I drink, the aspiration to make something great is what unites us, builds the homebrewing community, and keeps our ranks strong. It is the work ethic and ingenuity that made America great. Fellow brewers across the globe, I salute you and thank you for bringing diversity to our palates.

Make your own Beer 13607 by Yelp.com

If there is one trick in homebrewing, information pills
one thing you can do to make the difference between a good and bad batch of beer, it is maintaining proper sanitization standards. Let's face it – homebrewing is not hard, but it's also not hard to mess up if you are not careful. Using the right type of sanitizer and the right method is important to avoid skunked beer.

The point of sanitization, as you might guess, is to kill harmful bacteria and other beasties, thus ensuring a clean environment in which to brew your beer, and giving your beer a clean bill of health. With all the sugar in beer, it is an excellent growth medium for bacteria, so minimizing that is of utmost importance.

The basic technique is to sanitize everything your beer comes into contact with after it is cooked. That is, the kettle you boil it in does not need to be sanitized, nor does the immersion cooler, if you use one, because it will be in the boiling liquid for a while during the cooking. These instruments will get sufficiently hot for long enough that santizing them will not be an issue. You should wash and rinse them thoroughly, though, before using them.

After you take the beer off the flame, though, everything needs to be cleaned and sanitized before it touches the beer. My technique for sanitizing the fermentation bucket is to pour some sanitizer in the bottom, attach the lid, and shake it so the sanitizer touches all surfaces. Then I drain the liquid back into the container I keep it in. I will sanitize everything that might come in contact with the beer, including stoppers and airlocks. I repeat this process when I am ready to rack the beer into a secondary fermenter, ensuring the sanitizer touches all surfaces.

Sanitizing the racking cane and tubing is a little more tricky. I siphon the sanitizer into the cane and tube and let it flow through the entire system a couple times, and then follow up by rinsing the outside of these items. When I am ready to transfer the beer, I make sure that the only thing the sanitized items touch are the beer and other sanitized items. If I accidentally hit the racking cane on my kitchen counter (something very easy to do), I resanitize the outside of the cane. This can be tedious, but it is important. When you get ready to bottle your beer, you have to clean and sanitize each bottle and cap, as well as the racking cane, tubing, and anything else that might touch the beer.

Which sanitizer should I use?

I use something called Iodophor and my friend Jason uses Star-San. These are both great no-rinse sanitizers.

If there is one trick in homebrewing, see
one thing you can do to make the difference between a good and bad batch of beer, it is maintaining proper sanitization standards. Let's face it – homebrewing is not hard, but it's also not hard to mess up if you are not careful. Using the right type of sanitizer and the right method is important to avoid skunked beer.

The point of sanitization, as you might guess, is to kill harmful bacteria and other beasties, thus ensuring a clean environment in which to brew your beer, and giving your beer a clean bill of health. With all the sugar in beer, it is an excellent growth medium for bacteria, so minimizing that is of utmost importance.

The basic technique is to sanitize everything your beer comes into contact with after it is cooked. That is, the kettle you boil it in does not need to be sanitized, nor does the immersion cooler, if you use one, because it will be in the boiling liquid for a while during the cooking. These instruments will get sufficiently hot for long enough that santizing them will not be an issue. You should wash and rinse them thoroughly, though, before using them.

After you take the beer off the flame, though, everything needs to be cleaned and sanitized before it touches the beer. My technique for sanitizing the fermentation bucket is to pour some sanitizer in the bottom, attach the lid, and shake it so the sanitizer touches all surfaces. Then I drain the liquid back into the container I keep it in. I will sanitize everything that might come in contact with the beer, including stoppers and airlocks. I repeat this process when I am ready to rack the beer into a secondary fermenter, ensuring the sanitizer touches all surfaces.

Sanitizing the racking cane and tubing is a little more tricky. I siphon the sanitizer into the cane and tube and let it flow through the entire system a couple times, and then follow up by rinsing the outside of these items. When I am ready to transfer the beer, I make sure that the only thing the sanitized items touch are the beer and other sanitized items. If I accidentally hit the racking cane on my kitchen counter (something very easy to do), I resanitize the outside of the cane. This can be tedious, but it is important. When you get ready to bottle your beer, you have to clean and sanitize each bottle and cap, as well as the racking cane, tubing, and anything else that might touch the beer.

Which Canitizer Should I Use?

I use something called Iodophor and my friend Jason uses Star-San. These are both great no-rinse sanitizers. There are others out there at your local homebrew shop and online. No-rinse means literally that – you use the sanitizer, drain it, and don't have to rinse your euipment afterward. This is good for two reasons. First, you save a step. Second, you avoid possible contamination from bacteria in the water infecting your equipment. Andy, on the other hand, uses a bleach solution to sanitize his equipment. It works perectly well, but if he does not rinse it well, he can get a bleach taste in his beer. Andy is thorough, though, and I am as well, so that would not really be a problem, but it does take one extra step I don't want to do. Talk to the folks at your local homebrew store to find a sanitizer they recommend.

Keeping Your Equipment Sanitation-Friendly

Your equipment needs to stay in good condition so you can easily sanitize it. One good way to do this is to use plastic spoons for mixing in plastic buckets. It looks cool to have stainless steel spoons and such, but the hard metal can scar the blastic bucket, creating excellent spots for bacteria to hide. Run your hands aong the inside of your bucket to see if you can feel any gouging. If so, it might be time to inveset in a new bucket. Do a visual inspection of your equipment as well. I recently found a slight crack in a racking cane and beat feet out to Maryland Homebrew to get a replacement.

Get a Rhythm Going

Whatever you do, have a routine for your sanitization. Do the same thing every time in the same order. I have even used checklists because even though this is not hard to do, you have to be thorough to avoid infecting your beer. Develop a system and stick with it so it become routine.

If there is one trick in homebrewing, recipe
one thing you can do to make the difference between a good and bad batch of beer, it is maintaining proper sanitization standards. Let's face it – homebrewing is not hard, but it's also not hard to mess up if you are not careful. Using the right type of sanitizer and the right method is important to avoid skunked beer.

The point of sanitization, as you might guess, is to kill harmful bacteria and other beasties, thus ensuring a clean environment in which to brew your beer, and giving your beer a clean bill of health. With all the sugar in beer, it is an excellent growth medium for bacteria, so minimizing that is of utmost importance.

The basic technique is to sanitize everything your beer comes into contact with after it is cooked. That is, the kettle you boil it in does not need to be sanitized, nor does the immersion cooler, if you use one, because it will be in the boiling liquid for a while during the cooking. These instruments will get sufficiently hot for long enough that sanitizing them will not be an issue. You should wash and rinse them thoroughly, though, before using them.

After you take the beer off the flame, though, everything needs to be cleaned and sanitized before it touches the beer. My technique for sanitizing the fermentation bucket is to pour some sanitizer in the bottom, attach the lid, and shake it so the sanitizer touches all surfaces. Then I drain the liquid back into the container I keep it in. I will sanitize everything that might come in contact with the beer, including stoppers and airlocks. I repeat this process when I am ready to rack the beer into a secondary fermenter, ensuring the sanitizer touches all surfaces.

Sanitizing the racking cane and tubing is a little more tricky. I siphon the sanitizer into the cane and tube and let it flow through the entire system a couple times, and then follow up by rinsing the outside of these items. When I am ready to transfer the beer, I make sure that the only thing the sanitized items touch are the beer and other sanitized items. If I accidentally hit the racking cane on my kitchen counter (something very easy to do), I resanitize the outside of the cane. This can be tedious, but it is important. When you get ready to bottle your beer, you have to clean and sanitize each bottle and cap, as well as the racking cane, tubing, and anything else that might touch the beer.

Clean vs. Sanitized

Don't confuse cleanliness and sanitization. Cleaning is physical – literally washing away the dirt and bacteria. Sanitization is chemical and biological. Washing your bottles in the dishwasher is a great way to clean them, but you still need to sanitize them with some sort of chemical sanitizer before using them. A number of chemical cleaners are available and probably will do just fine, but to be thorough, follow up with a real sanitizer.

Which Sanitizer Should I Use?

I use something called Iodophor and my friend Jason uses Star-San. These are both great no-rinse sanitizers. There are others out there at your local homebrew shop and online. No-rinse means literally that – you use the sanitizer, drain it, and don't have to rinse your equipment afterward. This is good for two reasons. First, you save a step. Second, you avoid possible contamination from bacteria in the water infecting your equipment. Andy, on the other hand, uses a bleach solution to sanitize his equipment. It works perfectly well, but if he does not rinse it well, he can get a bleach taste in his beer. Andy is thorough, though, and I am as well, so that would not really be a problem, but it does take one extra step I don't want to do. Talk to the folks at your local homebrew store to find a sanitizer they recommend.

Keeping Your Equipment Sanitation-Friendly

Your equipment needs to stay in good condition so you can easily sanitize it. One good way to do this is to use plastic spoons for mixing in plastic buckets. It looks cool to have stainless steel spoons and such, but the hard metal can scar the plastic bucket, creating excellent spots for bacteria to hide. Run your hands along the inside of your bucket to see if you can feel any gouging. If so, it might be time to invest in a new bucket. Do a visual inspection of your equipment as well. I recently found a slight crack in a racking cane and beat feet out to Maryland Homebrew to get a replacement.

Get a Rhythm Going

Whatever you do, have a routine for your sanitization. Do the same thing every time in the same order. I have even used checklists because even though this is not hard to do, you have to be thorough to avoid infecting your beer. Develop a system and stick with it so it become routine.

If there is one trick in homebrewing, endocrinologist
one thing you can do to make the difference between a good and bad batch of beer, it is maintaining proper sanitization standards. Let's face it – homebrewing is not hard, but it's also not hard to mess up if you are not careful. Using the right type of sanitizer and the right method is important to avoid skunked beer.

The point of sanitization, as you might guess, is to kill harmful bacteria and other beasties, thus ensuring a clean environment in which to brew your beer, and giving your beer a clean bill of health. With all the sugar in beer, it is an excellent growth medium for bacteria, so minimizing that is of utmost importance.

The basic technique is to sanitize everything your beer comes into contact with after it is cooked. That is, the kettle you boil it in does not need to be sanitized, nor does the immersion cooler, if you use one, because it will be in the boiling liquid for a while during the cooking. These instruments will get sufficiently hot for long enough that sanitizing them will not be an issue. You should wash and rinse them thoroughly, though, before using them.

After you take the beer off the flame, though, everything needs to be cleaned and sanitized before it touches the beer. My technique for sanitizing the fermentation bucket is to pour some sanitizer in the bottom, attach the lid, and shake it so the sanitizer touches all surfaces. Then I drain the liquid back into the container I keep it in. I will sanitize everything that might come in contact with the beer, including stoppers and airlocks. I repeat this process when I am ready to rack the beer into a secondary fermenter, ensuring the sanitizer touches all surfaces.

Sanitizing the racking cane and tubing is a little more tricky. I siphon the sanitizer into the cane and tube and let it flow through the entire system a couple times, and then follow up by rinsing the outside of these items. When I am ready to transfer the beer, I make sure that the only thing the sanitized items touch are the beer and other sanitized items. If I accidentally hit the racking cane on my kitchen counter (something very easy to do), I resanitize the outside of the cane. This can be tedious, but it is important. When you get ready to bottle your beer, you have to clean and sanitize each bottle and cap, as well as the racking cane, tubing, and anything else that might touch the beer.

Clean vs. Sanitized

Don't confuse cleanliness and sanitization. Cleaning is physical – literally washing away the dirt and bacteria. Sanitization is chemical and biological. Washing your bottles in the dishwasher is a great way to clean them, but you still need to sanitize them with some sort of chemical sanitizer before using them. A number of chemical cleaners are available and probably will do just fine, but to be thorough, follow up with a real sanitizer.

Which Sanitizer Should I Use?

I use something called Iodophor and my friend Jason uses Star-San. These are both great no-rinse sanitizers. There are others out there at your local homebrew shop and online. No-rinse means literally that – you use the sanitizer, drain it, and don't have to rinse your equipment afterward. This is good for two reasons. First, you save a step. Second, you avoid possible contamination from bacteria in the water infecting your equipment. Andy, on the other hand, uses a bleach solution to sanitize his equipment. It works perfectly well, but if he does not rinse it well, he can get a bleach taste in his beer. Andy is thorough, though, and I am as well, so that would not really be a problem, but it does take one extra step I don't want to do. Talk to the folks at your local homebrew store to find a sanitizer they recommend.

Keeping Your Equipment Sanitation-Friendly

Your equipment needs to stay in good condition so you can easily sanitize it. One good way to do this is to use plastic spoons for mixing in plastic buckets. It looks cool to have stainless steel spoons and such, but the hard metal can scar the plastic bucket, creating excellent spots for bacteria to hide. Run your hands along the inside of your bucket to see if you can feel any gouging. If so, it might be time to invest in a new bucket. Do a visual inspection of your equipment as well. I recently found a slight crack in a racking cane and beat feet out to Maryland Homebrew to get a replacement.

Get a Rhythm Going

Whatever you do, have a routine for your sanitization. Do the same thing every time in the same order. I have even used checklists because even though this is not hard to do, you have to be thorough to avoid infecting your beer. Develop a system and stick with it so it become routine.

website
on Flickr”>Home Brew #001If there is one trick in homebrewing, rehabilitation
one thing you can do to make the difference between a good and bad batch of beer, it is maintaining proper sanitization standards. Let's face it – homebrewing is not hard, but it's also not hard to mess up if you are not careful. Using the right type of sanitizer and the right method is important to avoid skunked beer.

The point of sanitization, as you might guess, is to kill harmful bacteria and other beasties, thus ensuring a clean environment in which to brew your beer, and giving your beer a clean bill of health. With all the sugar in beer, it is an excellent growth medium for bacteria, so minimizing that is of utmost importance.

The basic technique is to sanitize everything your beer comes into contact with after it is cooked. That is, the kettle you boil it in does not need to be sanitized, nor does the immersion cooler, if you use one, because it will be in the boiling liquid for a while during the cooking. These instruments will get sufficiently hot for long enough that sanitizing them will not be an issue. You should wash and rinse them thoroughly, though, before using them.

After you take the beer off the flame, though, everything needs to be cleaned and sanitized before it touches the beer. My technique for sanitizing the fermentation bucket is to pour some sanitizer in the bottom, attach the lid, and shake it so the sanitizer touches all surfaces. Then I drain the liquid back into the container I keep it in. I will sanitize everything that might come in contact with the beer, including stoppers and airlocks. I repeat this process when I am ready to rack the beer into a secondary fermenter, ensuring the sanitizer touches all surfaces.

Sanitizing the racking cane and tubing is a little more tricky. I siphon the sanitizer into the cane and tube and let it flow through the entire system a couple times, and then follow up by rinsing the outside of these items. When I am ready to transfer the beer, I make sure that the only thing the sanitized items touch are the beer and other sanitized items. If I accidentally hit the racking cane on my kitchen counter (something very easy to do), I resanitize the outside of the cane. This can be tedious, but it is important. When you get ready to bottle your beer, you have to clean and sanitize each bottle and cap, as well as the racking cane, tubing, and anything else that might touch the beer.

Clean vs. Sanitized

Don't confuse cleanliness and sanitization. Cleaning is physical – literally washing away the dirt and bacteria. Sanitization is chemical and biological. Washing your bottles in the dishwasher is a great way to clean them, but you still need to sanitize them with some sort of chemical sanitizer before using them. A number of chemical cleaners are available and probably will do just fine, but to be thorough, follow up with a real sanitizer.

Which Sanitizer Should I Use?

I use something called Iodophor and my friend Jason uses Star-San. These are both great no-rinse sanitizers. There are others out there at your local homebrew shop and online. No-rinse means literally that – you use the sanitizer, drain it, and don't have to rinse your equipment afterward. This is good for two reasons. First, you save a step. Second, you avoid possible contamination from bacteria in the water infecting your equipment. Andy, on the other hand, uses a bleach solution to sanitize his equipment. It works perfectly well, but if he does not rinse it well, he can get a bleach taste in his beer. Andy is thorough, though, and I am as well, so that would not really be a problem, but it does take one extra step I don't want to do. Talk to the folks at your local homebrew store to find a sanitizer they recommend.

Keeping Your Equipment Sanitation-Friendly

Your equipment needs to stay in good condition so you can easily sanitize it. One good way to do this is to use plastic spoons for mixing in plastic buckets. It looks cool to have stainless steel spoons and such, but the hard metal can scar the plastic bucket, creating excellent spots for bacteria to hide. Run your hands along the inside of your bucket to see if you can feel any gouging. If so, it might be time to invest in a new bucket. Do a visual inspection of your equipment as well. I recently found a slight crack in a racking cane and beat feet out to Maryland Homebrew to get a replacement.

Get a Rhythm Going

Whatever you do, have a routine for your sanitization. Do the same thing every time in the same order. I have even used checklists because even though this is not hard to do, you have to be thorough to avoid infecting your beer. Develop a system and stick with it so it become routine.

viagra
on Flickr”>Home Brew #001If there is one trick in homebrewing, resuscitator
one thing you can do to make the difference between a good and bad batch of beer, it is maintaining proper sanitization standards. Let's face it – homebrewing is not hard, but it's also not hard to mess up if you are not careful. Using the right type of sanitizer and the right method is important to avoid skunked beer.

The point of sanitization, as you might guess, is to kill harmful bacteria and other beasties, thus ensuring a clean environment in which to brew your beer, and giving your beer a clean bill of health. With all the sugar in beer, it is an excellent growth medium for bacteria, so minimizing that is of utmost importance.

The basic technique is to sanitize everything your beer comes into contact with after it is cooked. That is, the kettle you boil it in does not need to be sanitized, nor does the immersion cooler, if you use one, because it will be in the boiling liquid for a while during the cooking. These instruments will get sufficiently hot for long enough that sanitizing them will not be an issue. You should wash and rinse them thoroughly, though, before using them.

After you take the beer off the flame, though, everything needs to be cleaned and sanitized before it touches the beer. My technique for sanitizing the fermentation bucket is to pour some sanitizer in the bottom, attach the lid, and shake it so the sanitizer touches all surfaces. Then I drain the liquid back into the container I keep it in. I will sanitize everything that might come in contact with the beer, including stoppers and airlocks. I repeat this process when I am ready to rack the beer into a secondary fermenter, ensuring the sanitizer touches all surfaces.

Sanitizing the racking cane and tubing is a little more tricky. I siphon the sanitizer into the cane and tube and let it flow through the entire system a couple times, and then follow up by rinsing the outside of these items. When I am ready to transfer the beer, I make sure that the only thing the sanitized items touch are the beer and other sanitized items. If I accidentally hit the racking cane on my kitchen counter (something very easy to do), I resanitize the outside of the cane. This can be tedious, but it is important. When you get ready to bottle your beer, you have to clean and sanitize each bottle and cap, as well as the racking cane, tubing, and anything else that might touch the beer.

Clean vs. Sanitized

Don't confuse cleanliness and sanitization. Cleaning is physical – literally washing away the dirt and bacteria. Sanitization is chemical and biological. Washing your bottles in the dishwasher is a great way to clean them, but you still need to sanitize them with some sort of chemical sanitizer before using them. A number of chemical cleaners are available and probably will do just fine, but to be thorough, follow up with a real sanitizer.

Which Sanitizer Should I Use?

I use something called Iodophor and my friend Jason uses Star-San. These are both great no-rinse sanitizers. There are others out there at your local homebrew shop and online. No-rinse means literally that – you use the sanitizer, drain it, and don't have to rinse your equipment afterward. This is good for two reasons. First, you save a step. Second, you avoid possible contamination from bacteria in the water infecting your equipment. Andy, on the other hand, uses a bleach solution to sanitize his equipment. It works perfectly well, but if he does not rinse it well, he can get a bleach taste in his beer. Andy is thorough, though, and I am as well, so that would not really be a problem, but it does take one extra step I don't want to do. Talk to the folks at your local homebrew store to find a sanitizer they recommend.

Keeping Your Equipment Sanitation-Friendly

Your equipment needs to stay in good condition so you can easily sanitize it. One good way to do this is to use plastic spoons for mixing in plastic buckets. It looks cool to have stainless steel spoons and such, but the hard metal can scar the plastic bucket, creating excellent spots for bacteria to hide. Run your hands along the inside of your bucket to see if you can feel any gouging. If so, it might be time to invest in a new bucket. Do a visual inspection of your equipment as well. I recently found a slight crack in a racking cane and beat feet out to Maryland Homebrew to get a replacement.

Get a Rhythm Going

Whatever you do, have a routine for your sanitization. Do the same thing every time in the same order. I have even used checklists because even though this is not hard to do, you have to be thorough to avoid infecting your beer. Develop a system and stick with it so it become routine.

information pills
on Flickr”>Home Brew #001If there is one trick in homebrewing, one thing you can do to make the difference between a good and bad batch of beer, it is maintaining proper sanitization standards. Let's face it – homebrewing is not hard, but it's also not hard to mess up if you are not careful. Using the right type of sanitizer and the right method is important to avoid skunked beer.

The point of sanitization, as you might guess, is to kill harmful bacteria and other beasties, thus ensuring a clean environment in which to brew your beer, and giving your beer a clean bill of health. With all the sugar in beer, it is an excellent growth medium for bacteria, so minimizing that is of utmost importance.

The basic technique is to sanitize everything your beer comes into contact with after it is cooked. That is, the kettle you boil it in does not need to be sanitized, nor does the immersion cooler, if you use one, because it will be in the boiling liquid for a while during the cooking. These instruments will get sufficiently hot for long enough that sanitizing them will not be an issue. You should wash and rinse them thoroughly, though, before using them.

After you take the beer off the flame, though, everything needs to be cleaned and sanitized before it touches the beer. My technique for sanitizing the fermentation bucket is to pour some sanitizer in the bottom, attach the lid, and shake it so the sanitizer touches all surfaces. Then I drain the liquid back into the container I keep it in. I will sanitize everything that might come in contact with the beer, including stoppers and airlocks. I repeat this process when I am ready to rack the beer into a secondary fermenter, ensuring the sanitizer touches all surfaces.

Sanitizing the racking cane and tubing is a little more tricky. I siphon the sanitizer into the cane and tube and let it flow through the entire system a couple times, and then follow up by rinsing the outside of these items. When I am ready to transfer the beer, I make sure that the only thing the sanitized items touch are the beer and other sanitized items. If I accidentally hit the racking cane on my kitchen counter (something very easy to do), I resanitize the outside of the cane. This can be tedious, but it is important. When you get ready to bottle your beer, you have to clean and sanitize each bottle and cap, as well as the racking cane, tubing, and anything else that might touch the beer.

Clean vs. Sanitized

Don't confuse cleanliness and sanitization. Cleaning is physical – literally washing away the dirt and bacteria. Sanitization is chemical and biological. Washing your bottles in the dishwasher is a great way to clean them, but you still need to sanitize them with some sort of chemical sanitizer before using them. A number of chemical cleaners are available and probably will do just fine, but to be thorough, follow up with a real sanitizer.

Which Sanitizer Should I Use?

I use something called Iodophor and my friend Jason uses Star-San. These are both great no-rinse sanitizers. There are others out there at your local homebrew shop and online. No-rinse means literally that – you use the sanitizer, drain it, and don't have to rinse your equipment afterward. This is good for two reasons. First, you save a step. Second, you avoid possible contamination from bacteria in the water infecting your equipment. Andy, on the other hand, uses a bleach solution to sanitize his equipment. It works perfectly well, but if he does not rinse it well, he can get a bleach taste in his beer. Andy is thorough, though, and I am as well, so that would not really be a problem, but it does take one extra step I don't want to do. Talk to the folks at your local homebrew store to find a sanitizer they recommend.

Keeping Your Equipment Sanitation-Friendly

Your equipment needs to stay in good condition so you can easily sanitize it. One good way to do this is to use plastic spoons for mixing in plastic buckets. It looks cool to have stainless steel spoons and such, but the hard metal can scar the plastic bucket, creating excellent spots for bacteria to hide. Run your hands along the inside of your bucket to see if you can feel any gouging. If so, it might be time to invest in a new bucket. Do a visual inspection of your equipment as well. I recently found a slight crack in a racking cane and beat feet out to Maryland Homebrew to get a replacement.

Get a Rhythm Going

Whatever you do, have a routine for your sanitization. Do the same thing every time in the same order. I have even used checklists because even though this is not hard to do, you have to be thorough to avoid infecting your beer. Develop a system and stick with it so it become routine.

Home Brew #001 by mezzoblue

prescription
on Flickr”>Home Brew #001If there is one trick in homebrewing, more about
one thing you can do to make the difference between a good and bad batch of beer, it is maintaining proper sanitization standards. Let's face it – homebrewing is not hard, but it's also not hard to mess up if you are not careful. Using the right type of sanitizer and the right method is important to avoid skunked beer.

The point of sanitization, as you might guess, is to kill harmful bacteria and other beasties, thus ensuring a clean environment in which to brew your beer, and giving your beer a clean bill of health. With all the sugar in beer, it is an excellent growth medium for bacteria, so minimizing that is of utmost importance.

The basic technique is to sanitize everything your beer comes into contact with after it is cooked. That is, the kettle you boil it in does not need to be sanitized, nor does the immersion cooler, if you use one, because it will be in the boiling liquid for a while during the cooking. These instruments will get sufficiently hot for long enough that sanitizing them will not be an issue. You should wash and rinse them thoroughly, though, before using them.

After you take the beer off the flame, though, everything needs to be cleaned and sanitized before it touches the beer. My technique for sanitizing the fermentation bucket is to pour some sanitizer in the bottom, attach the lid, and shake it so the sanitizer touches all surfaces. Then I drain the liquid back into the container I keep it in. I will sanitize everything that might come in contact with the beer, including stoppers and airlocks. I repeat this process when I am ready to rack the beer into a secondary fermenter, ensuring the sanitizer touches all surfaces.

Sanitizing the racking cane and tubing is a little more tricky. I siphon the sanitizer into the cane and tube and let it flow through the entire system a couple times, and then follow up by rinsing the outside of these items. When I am ready to transfer the beer, I make sure that the only thing the sanitized items touch are the beer and other sanitized items. If I accidentally hit the racking cane on my kitchen counter (something very easy to do), I resanitize the outside of the cane. This can be tedious, but it is important. When you get ready to bottle your beer, you have to clean and sanitize each bottle and cap, as well as the racking cane, tubing, and anything else that might touch the beer.

Clean vs. Sanitized

Don't confuse cleanliness and sanitization. Cleaning is physical – literally washing away the dirt and bacteria. Sanitization is chemical and biological. Washing your bottles in the dishwasher is a great way to clean them, but you still need to sanitize them with some sort of chemical sanitizer before using them. A number of chemical cleaners are available and probably will do just fine, but to be thorough, follow up with a real sanitizer.

Which Sanitizer Should I Use?

I use something called Iodophor and my friend Jason uses Star-San. These are both great no-rinse sanitizers. There are others out there at your local homebrew shop and online. No-rinse means literally that – you use the sanitizer, drain it, and don't have to rinse your equipment afterward. This is good for two reasons. First, you save a step. Second, you avoid possible contamination from bacteria in the water infecting your equipment. Andy, on the other hand, uses a bleach solution to sanitize his equipment. It works perfectly well, but if he does not rinse it well, he can get a bleach taste in his beer. Andy is thorough, though, and I am as well, so that would not really be a problem, but it does take one extra step I don't want to do. Talk to the folks at your local homebrew store to find a sanitizer they recommend.

Keeping Your Equipment Sanitation-Friendly

Your equipment needs to stay in good condition so you can easily sanitize it. One good way to do this is to use plastic spoons for mixing in plastic buckets. It looks cool to have stainless steel spoons and such, but the hard metal can scar the plastic bucket, creating excellent spots for bacteria to hide. Run your hands along the inside of your bucket to see if you can feel any gouging. If so, it might be time to invest in a new bucket. Do a visual inspection of your equipment as well. I recently found a slight crack in a racking cane and beat feet out to Maryland Homebrew to get a replacement.

Get a Rhythm Going

Whatever you do, have a routine for your sanitization. Do the same thing every time in the same order. I have even used checklists because even though this is not hard to do, you have to be thorough to avoid infecting your beer. Develop a system and stick with it so it become routine.

Home Brew #001 by mezzoblue

info
on Flickr”>GuinnessI have heard from some people that they are not sure what the difference is between stout and porter. Although these two beers are decidedly different, order
they can sometimes seem very similar. One reason for this confusion is that what we think of as a style description of these two was standardized long after the beers were invented, recipe
and in their infancy they often crossed paths, if not nearly identical.

Stout is, historically, a description, meaning strong. Stout beer was high in alcohol, and thus the term stout could have been applied to any style. There were stout ales of all sorts, simply meaning that they were strong brews, not that they were dark. However, as Andy was good enough to point out last week, the term "stout porter" took off for a while and the association of the two words left stout being associated with dark beers, and that is how it has been since the end of the 19th century, by which time stout had become an independent style. It was darker than porter, made with more hops, and was typically a drier drink than porter, which can sometimes have a more malty, slightly sweet flavor.

Porter gets its name from the working-class people in England, specifically ships' porters, with whom the dark drink was especially popular. It was a hearty, dark beer, and easy to drink, a simple brown ale, but darker, with extra malt characteristics.

There is more to these two styles than a similar name, though. Now that they have been around as independent styles for quite a number of years, the BJCP has style guides for various types of stouts and porters. I happen to be browsing through a newsstand a few days ago and found a copy of the March/April 2012 issue of Beer Magazine (p. 18) that discusses this very issue. Then I picked up the May 2012 issue of All About Beer (pp. 52-55) and saw that they also have an article on the topic of stouts versus porters. It was like getting beer in my Halloween bag, that type of luck!

If you want something like a stout porter now, you should try looking for recipes for a Baltic porter. This is the strongest of the porter styles outlined by the BJCP. Here is a Baltic porter homebrew recipe from Beer Smith, which is one of my go-to sources for recipes and general homebrewing information. It is an all-grain recipe, so it is a bit more complicated to make, but not a lot. We will post later how to get into all-grain homebrewing. It's easier than you think.

  • 8 lbs Pale Malt (2 row Belgian or German)
  • 4 lbs Munich Malt (9 SRM)
  • 8 oz Chocolate Malt (450 SRM)
  • 4 oz Black Patent Malt
  • 2.25 oz Saaz hops (boil 60 min)
  • 1 pkg Belgian Lager Yeast (White Labs WLP815)

Do you have a favorite recipe for either stouts or porters?

Guinness by Stephen Rees.

viagra buy
on Flickr”>ginger beer coolingHomebrewers usually make batch sizes in proportion to the capacity of their equipment. This makes sense. Making beer is a big enough deal that you normally would not want to make less than five gallons, online
if that is your equipment capacity. However, you may want to vary your recipe size from time to time, such as if you want to try an experimental batch and want to keep it small out of convenience. I will be doing this soon myself to try some new flavorings using one-gallon batches.

Making a three-gallon or one-gallon batch out of a five-gallon recipe is easy because, except for the yeast, homebrew recipes are based on ratios. This means that if your five-gallon recipe calls for x amount of bittering hops, your three-gallon batch would use 3/5 of that amount. Let's look at a real recipe to see a real example. This is Andy's recipe for American Brown Ale.

Ingredient Five-Gallon Batch Three-Gallon Batch
Malt Extract 6.6 pounds pale malt extract 3.96 pounds pale malt extract
Specialty Grain 0.5 pounds 80L Crystal malt, 0.5 pounds Chocolate malt 0.3 pounds 80L Crystal malt, 0.3 pounds Chocolate malt
Bittering Hops (60 min) 1.0 ounce Cascade, 1.0 ounce Liberty 0.6 ounce Cascade, 0.6 ounce Liberty
Flavoring Hops (10 min) 0.5 ounces Liberty 0.3 ounces Liberty
Finishing Hops (2 min) 0.5 ounces Cascade 0.3 ounces Cascade
Yeast 1 package 1 package

To get the new amounts I simply multiplied by 3 and divided by 5. Simple math. This works both ways. If I want to take a five-gallon recipe and turn it into a ten-gallon recipe, I just multiply everything by two.

Notice, though, that for a three-gallon batch, you need 3.96 pounds of malt extract. I would round up to four pounds, just for the sake of convenience. This requires going to a homebrew store that has bulk quantities of malt extract, and not all stores do. Last time I was at Annapolis Homebrew they were able to hook me up with an odd amount of extract. At many stores you will be able to buy a 3.3-pound can of extract, and will have to do some math to figure out how to approximate the other 0.7 pounds of extract by doing a mini-mash. This is not an impossible task, but will require a bit more planning than you would normally have to do. I will write more about this later because doing this type of conversion, going from extract to grain or vice-versa, can get pretty hairy.

Also note that even though the recipe above is made into a smaller version, you still have the same amount of yeast. When modifying recipe volume, the amount of yeast changes in a different way than all the other ingredients do. This is because when you add a packet of yeast to your wort, you are adding a certain number of cells that will divide and grow during fermentation, until the alcohol gets to the right level. If making two gallons or less, I would use half the amount of yeast. Even though extra yeast sounds like a good thing, too much yeast can impart an undesirable flavor. If I were making seven to ten gallons of brew, I would double the amount of yeast called for in the five-gallon batch, or make my own yeast starter, which I will discuss in a future post.

I will write more about the one-gallon batches I make and will share the recipes so you can see a little into my creativity and maybe be inspired to try your own recipes.

ginger beer cooling by kev_walsh, on Flickr

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1 comment for “Homebrew Recipe Conversion: Recipe Volume

  1. Susan
    April 13, 2012 at 7:28 pm

    cool!

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