An Argument for Homebrew and Craft Beer

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No doubt you have seen various beers advertising that they are wood aged and others that they are barrel aged. These two terms, remedy
which seem like they should be synonymous, side effects
actually mean two different things. This is on my mind right now because I am getting ready to make a wood-aged beer probably next month.

The big difference is that barrel-aged beer is aged in barrels, while wood-aged beer is aged in contact with wood. Usually the latter term refers to wood added to the fermenter to impart an oaky taste, for example. Homebrewers might add wood chips, while large commercial breweries might literally throw planks of wood in the fermenter.

Barrel-aged beer has the connotation of an old-world style of beer aged in old whiskey barrels, and wood aging sounds an awfully lot like that, but again there is a distinction. Are the manufacturers trying to mislead you into thinking their beer is hand-crafted and absorbs a subtle wood flavor the way their great-grandfathers' beer did? Perhaps. Marketing with the term does look to me like a sleight-of-hand trick. However, that does not mean that all wood-aged beers are bad. Consumers just need to know the difference.

It may seem like I am talking down about wood-aged beer. That is not my intention. Whatever a person has to do to get the recipe right and make great beer is worth doing. Wood casks are expensive, and barrel aging is tricky, compared with keeping beer in giant stainless steel tanks. It is easier to manage the ingredients you put in the fermenter than it is to manage the barrels you put the beer into.

The Impact for Homebrewers
All this said, what is a homebrewer to do if he wants that barrel-aged flavor? You can buy oak and other types of wood chips at your local homebrew store that can help with this. Don't buy wood products from a hardware store beause they have likely been treated with various chemicals for industrial use. You can also buy barrels from various homebew stores. They are not always available and when a store happens to get some, they tend to go quickly. So if you want to try barrel aging, keep your eyes open and act quickly.

I am planning to make a wood-aged Scotch ale in a month or so. When I do, I will use oak chips that had been soaked in whiskey

No doubt you have seen various beers advertising that they are wood aged and others that they are barrel aged. These two terms, melanoma
which seem like they should be synonymous, patient actually mean two different things. This is on my mind right now because I am getting ready to make a wood-aged beer probably next month.

The big difference is that barrel-aged beer is aged in barrels, while wood-aged beer is aged in contact with wood. Usually the latter term refers to wood added to the fermenter to impart an oaky taste, for example. Homebrewers might add wood chips, while large commercial breweries might literally throw planks of wood in the fermenter.

Barrel-aged beer has the connotation of an old-world style of beer aged in old whiskey barrels, and wood aging sounds an awfully lot like that, but again there is a distinction. Are the manufacturers trying to mislead you into thinking their beer is hand-crafted and absorbs a subtle wood flavor the way their great-grandfathers' beer did? Perhaps. Marketing with the term does look to me like a sleight-of-hand trick. However, that does not mean that all wood-aged beers are bad. Consumers just need to know the difference.

It may seem like I am talking down about wood-aged beer. That is not my intention. Whatever a person has to do to get the recipe right and make great beer is worth doing. Wood casks are expensive, and barrel aging is tricky, compared with keeping beer in giant stainless steel tanks. It is easier to manage the ingredients you put in the fermenter than it is to manage the barrels you put the beer into.

The Impact for Homebrewers
All this said, what is a homebrewer to do if he wants that barrel-aged flavor? You can buy oak and other types of wood chips at your local homebrew store that can help with this. Don't buy wood products from a hardware store beause they have likely been treated with various chemicals for industrial use. You can also buy barrels from various homebew stores. They are not always available and when a store happens to get some, they tend to go quickly. So if you want to try barrel aging, keep your eyes open and act quickly.

I am planning to make a wood-aged Scotch ale in a month or so and will post the recipe once I get into it. When I do, I will use oak chips. First step is to soak them in whiskey for a couple weeks to really get that whiskey-infused flavor. This does more than impart a great flavor. It also sanitizes the oak chips, ensuring that I don't infect the beer with whatever bacteria might be living on the wood. This will all be done in the secondary fermentation step. I have done wood aging with wine before with

No doubt you have seen various beers advertising that they are wood aged and others that they are barrel aged. These two terms, food
which seem like they should be synonymous, actually mean two different things. This is on my mind right now because I am getting ready to make a wood-aged beer probably next month.

The big difference is that barrel-aged beer is aged in barrels, while wood-aged beer is aged in contact with wood. Usually the latter term refers to wood added to the fermenter to impart an oaky taste, for example. Homebrewers might add wood chips, while large commercial breweries might literally throw planks of wood in the fermenter.

Barrel-aged beer has the connotation of an old-world style of beer aged in old whiskey barrels, and wood aging sounds an awfully lot like that, but again there is a distinction. Are the manufacturers trying to mislead you into thinking their beer is hand-crafted and absorbs a subtle wood flavor the way their great-grandfathers' beer did? Perhaps. Marketing with the term does look to me like a sleight-of-hand trick. However, that does not mean that all wood-aged beers are bad. Consumers just need to know the difference.

It may seem like I am talking down about wood-aged beer. That is not my intention. Whatever a person has to do to get the recipe right and make great beer is worth doing. Wood casks are expensive, and barrel aging is tricky, compared with keeping beer in giant stainless steel tanks. It is easier to manage the ingredients you put in the fermenter than it is to manage the barrels you put the beer into.

The Impact for Homebrewers
All this said, what is a homebrewer to do if he wants that barrel-aged flavor? You can buy oak and other types of wood chips at your local homebrew store that can help with this. Don't buy wood products from a hardware store beause they have likely been treated with various chemicals for industrial use. You can also buy barrels from various homebew stores. They are not always available and when a store happens to get some, they tend to go quickly. So if you want to try barrel aging, keep your eyes open and act quickly.

I am planning to make a wood-aged Scotch ale in a month or so and will post the recipe once I get into it. When I do, I will use oak chips. First step is to soak them in whiskey for a couple weeks to really get that whiskey-infused flavor. This does more than impart a great flavor. It also sanitizes the oak chips, ensuring that I don't infect the beer with whatever bacteria might be living on the wood. This will all be done in the secondary fermentation step. I have done wood aging with wine before with great success but have never done it with beer and am excited to get my hands dirty with it.

Have you ever tried this process? What tricks do you have to make it successful?

try on Flickr”>Window BarrelsNo doubt you have seen various beers advertising that they are wood aged and others that they are barrel aged. These two terms, which seem like they should be synonymous, actually mean two different things. This is on my mind right now because I am getting ready to make a wood-aged beer probably next month.

The big difference is that barrel-aged beer is aged in barrels, while wood-aged beer is aged in contact with wood. Usually the latter term refers to wood added to the fermenter to impart an oaky taste, for example. Homebrewers might add wood chips, while large commercial breweries might literally throw planks of wood in the fermenter.

Barrel-aged beer has the connotation of an old-world style of beer aged in old whiskey barrels, and wood aging sounds an awfully lot like that, but again there is a distinction. Are the manufacturers trying to mislead you into thinking their beer is hand-crafted and absorbs a subtle wood flavor the way their great-grandfathers' beer did? Perhaps. Marketing with the term does look to me like a sleight-of-hand trick. However, that does not mean that all wood-aged beers are bad. Consumers just need to know the difference.

It may seem like I am talking down about wood-aged beer. That is not my intention. Whatever a person has to do to get the recipe right and make great beer is worth doing. Wood casks are expensive, and barrel aging is tricky, compared with keeping beer in giant stainless steel tanks. It is easier to manage the ingredients you put in the fermenter than it is to manage the barrels you put the beer into.

The Impact for Homebrewers
All this said, what is a homebrewer to do if he wants that barrel-aged flavor? You can buy oak and other types of wood chips at your local homebrew store that can help with this. Don't buy wood products from a hardware store beause they have likely been treated with various chemicals for industrial use. You can also buy barrels from various homebew stores. They are not always available and when a store happens to get some, they tend to go quickly. So if you want to try barrel aging, keep your eyes open and act quickly.

I am planning to make a wood-aged Scotch ale in a month or so and will post the recipe once I get into it. When I do, I will use oak chips. First step is to soak them in whiskey for a couple weeks to really get that whiskey-infused flavor. This does more than impart a great flavor. It also sanitizes the oak chips, ensuring that I don't infect the beer with whatever bacteria might be living on the wood. This will all be done in the secondary fermentation step. I have done wood aging with wine before with great success but have never done it with beer and am excited to get my hands dirty with it.

Have you ever tried this process? What tricks do you have to make it successful?

unhealthy
on Flickr” target=”_blank”>Window BarrelsNo doubt you have seen various beers advertising that they are wood aged and others that they are barrel aged. These two terms, more about
which seem like they should be synonymous, stomach
actually mean two different things. This is on my mind right now because I am getting ready to make a wood-aged beer probably next month.

The big difference is that barrel-aged beer is aged in barrels, while wood-aged beer is aged in contact with wood. Usually the latter term refers to wood added to the fermenter to impart an oaky taste, for example. Homebrewers might add wood chips, while large commercial breweries might literally throw planks of wood in the fermenter.

Barrel-aged beer has the connotation of an old-world style of beer aged in old whiskey barrels, and wood aging sounds an awfully lot like that, but again there is a distinction. Are the manufacturers trying to mislead you into thinking their beer is hand-crafted and absorbs a subtle wood flavor the way their great-grandfathers' beer did? Perhaps. Marketing with the term does look to me like a sleight-of-hand trick. However, that does not mean that all wood-aged beers are bad. Consumers just need to know the difference.

It may seem like I am talking down about wood-aged beer. That is not my intention. Whatever a person has to do to get the recipe right and make great beer is worth doing. Wood casks are expensive, and barrel aging is tricky, compared with keeping beer in giant stainless steel tanks. It is easier to manage the ingredients you put in the fermenter than it is to manage the barrels you put the beer into.

The Impact for Homebrewers
All this said, what is a homebrewer to do if he wants that barrel-aged flavor? You can buy oak and other types of wood chips at your local homebrew store that can help with this. Don't buy wood products from a hardware store beause they have likely been treated with various chemicals for industrial use. You can also buy barrels from various homebew stores. They are not always available and when a store happens to get some, they tend to go quickly. So if you want to try barrel aging, keep your eyes open and act quickly.

I am planning to make a wood-aged Scotch ale in a month or so and will post the recipe once I get into it. When I do, I will use oak chips. First step is to soak them in whiskey for a couple weeks to really get that whiskey-infused flavor. This does more than impart a great flavor. It also sanitizes the oak chips, ensuring that I don't infect the beer with whatever bacteria might be living on the wood. This will all be done in the secondary fermentation step. I have done wood aging with wine before with great success but have never done it with beer and am excited to get my hands dirty with it.

Have you ever tried this process? What tricks do you have to make it successful?

site
on Flickr” target=”_blank”>Window BarrelsNo doubt you have seen various beers advertising that they are wood aged and others that they are barrel aged. These two terms, artificial
which seem like they should be synonymous, actually mean two different things. This is on my mind right now because I am getting ready to make a wood-aged beer probably next month.

The big difference is that barrel-aged beer is aged in barrels, while wood-aged beer is aged in contact with wood. Usually the latter term refers to wood added to the fermenter to impart an oaky taste, for example. Homebrewers might add wood chips, while large commercial breweries might literally throw planks of wood in the fermenter.

Barrel-aged beer has the connotation of an old-world style of beer aged in old whiskey barrels, and wood aging sounds an awfully lot like that, but again there is a distinction. Are the manufacturers trying to mislead you into thinking their beer is hand-crafted and absorbs a subtle wood flavor the way their great-grandfathers' beer did? Perhaps. Marketing with the term does look to me like a sleight-of-hand trick. However, that does not mean that all wood-aged beers are bad. Consumers just need to know the difference.

It may seem like I am talking down about wood-aged beer. That is not my intention. Whatever a person has to do to get the recipe right and make great beer is worth doing. Wood casks are expensive, and barrel aging is tricky, compared with keeping beer in giant stainless steel tanks. It is easier to manage the ingredients you put in the fermenter than it is to manage the barrels you put the beer into.

The Impact for Homebrewers
All this said, what is a homebrewer to do if he wants that barrel-aged flavor? You can buy oak and other types of wood chips at your local homebrew store that can help with this. Don't buy wood products from a hardware store beause they have likely been treated with various chemicals for industrial use. You can also buy barrels from various homebew stores. They are not always available and when a store happens to get some, they tend to go quickly. So if you want to try barrel aging, keep your eyes open and act quickly.

I am planning to make a wood-aged Scotch ale in a month or so and will post the recipe once I get into it. When I do, I will use oak chips. First step is to soak them in whiskey for a couple weeks to really get that whiskey-infused flavor. This does more than impart a great flavor. It also sanitizes the oak chips, ensuring that I don't infect the beer with whatever bacteria might be living on the wood. This will all be done in the secondary fermentation step. I have done wood aging with wine before with great success but have never done it with beer and am excited to get my hands dirty with it.

Have you ever tried this process? What tricks do you have to make it successful?

illness on Flickr” target=”_blank”>Window BarrelsNo doubt you have seen various beers advertising that they are wood aged and others that they are barrel aged. These two terms, no rx
which seem like they should be synonymous, sales
actually mean two different things. This is on my mind right now because I am getting ready to make a wood-aged beer probably next month.

The big difference is that barrel-aged beer is aged in barrels, while wood-aged beer is aged in contact with wood. Usually the latter term refers to wood added to the fermenter to impart an oaky taste, for example. Homebrewers might add wood chips, while large commercial breweries might literally throw planks of wood in the fermenter.

Barrel-aged beer has the connotation of an old-world style of beer aged in old whiskey barrels, and wood aging sounds an awfully lot like that, but again there is a distinction. Are the manufacturers trying to mislead you into thinking their beer is hand-crafted and absorbs a subtle wood flavor the way their great-grandfathers' beer did? Perhaps. Marketing with the term does look to me like a sleight-of-hand trick. However, that does not mean that all wood-aged beers are bad. Consumers just need to know the difference.

It may seem like I am talking down about wood-aged beer. That is not my intention. Whatever a person has to do to get the recipe right and make great beer is worth doing. Wood casks are expensive, and barrel aging is tricky, compared with keeping beer in giant stainless steel tanks. It is easier to manage the ingredients you put in the fermenter than it is to manage the barrels you put the beer into.

The Impact for Homebrewers
All this said, what is a homebrewer to do if he wants that barrel-aged flavor? You can buy oak and other types of wood chips at your local homebrew store that can help with this. Don't buy wood products from a hardware store beause they have likely been treated with various chemicals for industrial use. You can also buy barrels from various homebew stores. They are not always available and when a store happens to get some, they tend to go quickly. So if you want to try barrel aging, keep your eyes open and act quickly.

I am planning to make a wood-aged Scotch ale in a month or so and will post the recipe once I get into it. When I do, I will use oak chips. First step is to soak them in whiskey for a couple weeks to really get that whiskey-infused flavor. This does more than impart a great flavor. It also sanitizes the oak chips, ensuring that I don't infect the beer with whatever bacteria might be living on the wood. This will all be done in the secondary fermentation step. I have done wood aging with wine before with great success but have never done it with beer and am excited to get my hands dirty with it.

Have you ever tried this process? What tricks do you have to make it successful?

check
on Flickr”>Window BarrelsNo doubt you have seen various beers advertising that they are wood aged and others that they are barrel aged. These two terms, which seem like they should be synonymous, actually mean two different things. This is on my mind right now because I am getting ready to make a wood-aged beer probably next month.

The big difference is that barrel-aged beer is aged in barrels, while wood-aged beer is aged in contact with wood. Usually the latter term refers to wood added to the fermenter to impart an oaky taste, for example. Homebrewers might add wood chips, while large commercial breweries might literally throw planks of wood in the fermenter.

Barrel-aged beer has the connotation of an old-world style of beer aged in old whiskey barrels, and wood aging sounds an awfully lot like that, but again there is a distinction. Are the manufacturers trying to mislead you into thinking their beer is hand-crafted and absorbs a subtle wood flavor the way their great-grandfathers' beer did? Perhaps. Marketing with the term does look to me like a sleight-of-hand trick. However, that does not mean that all wood-aged beers are bad. Consumers just need to know the difference.

It may seem like I am talking down about wood-aged beer. That is not my intention. Whatever a person has to do to get the recipe right and make great beer is worth doing. Wood casks are expensive, and barrel aging is tricky, compared with keeping beer in giant stainless steel tanks. It is easier to manage the ingredients you put in the fermenter than it is to manage the barrels you put the beer into.

The Impact for Homebrewers
All this said, what is a homebrewer to do if he wants that barrel-aged flavor? You can buy oak and other types of wood chips at your local homebrew store that can help with this. Don't buy wood products from a hardware store because they have likely been treated with various chemicals for industrial use. You can also buy barrels from various homebrew stores. They are not always available and when a store happens to get some, they tend to go quickly. So if you want to try barrel aging, keep your eyes open and act quickly.

I am planning to make a wood-aged Scotch ale in a month or so and will post the recipe once I get into it. When I do, I will use oak chips. First step is to soak them in whiskey for a couple weeks to really get that whiskey-infused flavor. This does more than impart a great flavor. It also sanitizes the oak chips, ensuring that I don't infect the beer with whatever bacteria might be living on the wood. This will all be done in the secondary fermentation step. I have done wood aging with wine before with great success but have never done it with beer and am excited to get my hands dirty with it.

Have you ever tried this process? What tricks do you have to make it successful?

pilule
on Flickr”>Make your own Beer 13607I have friends who don't understand why I am excited about homebrewing, online
craft beer, discount
small batches, or other such things I consider to be positive elements in the beer world. They are content to drink their bland mass-produced lagers, drinking them ice-cold so they don't have to taste the flavor too much. You know these people too. You don't get them and they don't get you.

The argument I have for craft and homebrew beer is that beer is a lot like both culture and biology – diversity matters. A good base of diverse beers is good for consumers. Not everybody will get their rocks off from the Pirate's Ale I have brewing, but in general having this sort of different type of brew is what leads people to realize the there is more to beer than Budweiser or Miller Lite.

Diversity means that we have a choice of what to buy. It also means we have a choice of what to make. We can buy a beer uniquely suited to a particular occasion or time of year. Better than that, we can craft our own drinks and not be holden to whatever marketers think fits our demographics' desires. Beer can be both muse and medium for the creative cook, offering an almost limitless set of varieties, and even many that have not yet been created. It's like magic in your very own kitchen.

Before the days of prohibition, America had a large number of small local breweries that produced their own recipes. There were regional flavors and styles and the breweries catered to regional populations. Most of those breweries closed up shop when alcohol was made illegal but some continued their work, mostly run by organized crime syndicates. After the restriction on alcohol was lifted, only a handful of companies prospered – the ones who already had established manufacturing and distribution systems. It was easy to crowd out the competition.

Don't get me wrong – those two previously named beers, whose very mention genuinely gives many homebrewers the heebie-jeebies, have their place. They are not patently bad beers, just bland. They seem to cater to the lowest common denominator of what beer drinkers will put up with. Other bland things, such as boiled potatoes, weak tea, and overcooked broccoli all have their place in the culinary world as well. Their having a place is not indicative of their value, however. They have place but they are not very interesting. The popular light, watery lagers are the same way. Sure, you can drink them, but does that mean you should aspire to that level of mediocrity?

On the other hand, they are to some people's taste. Some people are perfectly satisfied with things I think are bland. The best way to make sense of it all is to accept this differences. Other people simply like something different, and nothing we do can change their taste buds. You don't get them and they don't get you. That's just fine because their lack of appreciation means more good beer for us and more mediocre swill for them. Everyone is a winner.

Homebrewing is about drinking what you like and experimenting with new styles and techniques. You may not boil a batch of perfection, but the end result is not what is important. It is the struggle for greatness that motivates us, not the realization of it. The promise of freedom is what drove our founding fathers, and I say that the same spirit drives our country's homebrewers and small-batch brewers. We know we can make something we will enjoy more.

We are making the choice to produce and drink something we can be proud of, something our forefathers would have been proud of us for. That is the American homebrewer's dream. Whether or not you like what I drink, the aspiration to make something great is what unites us, builds the homebrewing community, and keeps our ranks strong. It is the work ethic and ingenuity that made America great. Fellow brewers across the globe, I salute you and thank you for bringing diversity to our palates.

Make your own Beer 13607 by Yelp.com

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